• December 28, 2014 /  Uncategorized

    Her legacy still lives on today. Thousands of fans and curious visitors, who may not be familiar with her work, visit her two former homes in Indiana. They learn that the main purpose of Mrs. Porter’s novels is to focus the reader’s attention on the importance of the natural world. The main characters in her books discover that nature has spiritual and restorative powers. Read one of her books, and it is easy to see why Gene Stratton-Porter’s popularity as a writer made her a leading spokesperson for the early conservation movement in America.

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  • THE LIMBERLOST SWAMP

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    December 28, 2014 /  Uncategorized

    The location of the Limberlost Cabin was close to the Limberlost Swamp, which covered approximately 13,000 acres in the southern part of Adams County, the northern part of Jay County, and a small portion of Wells County in Indiana and Mercer County in Ohio.

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  • THE LIMBERLOST CABIN

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    December 28, 2014 /  Uncategorized

    This home is an Indiana State Historic Site, administered by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, and managed by the Indiana State Museum. The Porters built the home in 1895 after Charles Porter, Gene’s husband, could afford to build a home that reflected his financial & business success. The white cedar logs used to construct the home came from Wisconsin. The architectural style is an unusual “Queen Anne Rustic”. The interior is more indicative of the late Victorian period. Much of the interior paneling is quarter sawn red oak. The music room’s lincrusta is beautifully restored.

    The Limberlost Cabin has 14 rooms, many of them restored to their original detail by skilled artisans. Mrs. Porter worked with the architect to design the home, and there is an obvious attention to detail. The home features some original pieces including bedroom furniture by Grand Rapids Furniture Company (Michigan). Some items were still in the home when it was donated to the state in 1947 such as Mrs. Porters Moth and Butterfly collection as well as a mounted Golden Eagle. Today, the Limberlost Cabin still has the warm, embracing, charm that it had when the Porters lived in the home a century ago.

    Randy Lehman is the Curator, and manages the site with the help of the Friends of the Limberlost, local volunteers, who sponsor events throughout the year and raise money for the site and for wetland restoration projects.

  • December 28, 2014 /  Uncategorized

    Gene (born Geneva) Grace Stratton is one of Indiana’s most famous female authors. She was a prime example of an independent woman, an accomplished naturalist, and a born story-teller.

    Born near Wabash, Indiana on August 17, 1863, she was the youngest of 12 children. Her parents, Mark & Mary Stratton, raised their children on a farm near Lagro, Indiana, located in Wabash County. From a humble Hoosier homestead and with not even a high school diploma, Gene Stratton-Porter would eventually become a famous author, naturalist, talented photographer, and movie producer.

    Two of her Indiana homes are state historic sites. The Limberlost State Historic Site in Geneva, Indiana, was Gene’s home from 1895-1913, but altogether she lived 25 years in Geneva. It was in Geneva that she, her husband (Charles Porter) and daughter (Jeannette), lived near the 13,000 acre Limberlost Swamp in a 14-room Queen Ann style log cabin home that she called “Limberlost”.

    Mrs. Porter lived until December 7, 1924. A streetcar accident claimed her life in Los Angeles. At the time of her death she was considered to be one of the wealthiest female authors in America and had an estimated 50 million people (nearly half the population of America) reading her books. For a thorough biography of Gene Stratton-Porter, see Gene Stratton-Porter, Novelist and Naturalist by Judith Reick Long – Published by Indiana Historical Society – Indianapolis 1990.